How to move from Point A to Point B

7 October 2018

How to move from Point A to Point B

There is this delightful notion from Douglas Pagels:

Some of the secret joys are not found by rushing from Point A to Point B, but by inventing some imaginary letters along the way.

 

On the Pacific Crest Trail; photo: Kristi

 

My son, Jeremy, and daughter-in-law, Denise, travel in a 30′ Airstream when they’re working across the U.S. But on international locations, I’m called in to grand-dog-sit a little Brussels griffon: Chloe, who looks like one of the ewoks on Star Wars.

And it’s always a fun assignment because it involves a mini-vacation in whatever gorgeous location (these past two weeks in Cascade Locks on the Columbia River) with uninterrupted writing time.

While my son and daughter-in-law hurried off to Point B in Ireland—because this is the season of their lives in which they’re working long hours to build a successful business—my grand-dog, Chloe, and I invented several imaginary letters between A and B.

We visited the historic lodge at Multnomah Falls …

 

Multnomah Lodge; all photos: Marlys, unless otherwise indicated

 

Multnomah Falls with ewok grand-dog (photo: fellow tourist)

 

… and marveled at the single-handed sailboats, and sternwheelers, and kite boarders on the Columbia River.


Kite boarding on the Columbia

 

At the campground, I met a new friend, Kristi. She and I hiked up to Dry Creek Falls. Where it happened to intersect the Pacific Coast Trail, we detoured so we could say we hiked part of the PCT. Because who wouldn’t want to make that claim?

 

Dry Creek Falls

Lunch afterward: Salmon and veggies over brown rice in a chili teriyaki sauce. Oh. My. Delicious.

 

Kristi is an early-retiree, towing the cutest little 16’ Airstream. Have to say, I was completely impressed as she prepared to pull out to her next adventure—first teaching me some of the finer points of hitching an Airstream to a truck.

 

16’ Airstream Bambi Sport

 

And I found myself thinking, Hmmm … full-time in an Airstream. What would that look like?

If Kristi is doing this six months out of the year, could I? If I’m going to live in an Airstream as a tiny home—whether on the road or parked in central Oregon—it would probably need to be bigger than 16′. But would I be able to tow a longer Airstream?

I picked Jeremy & Denise up at the Portland airport at the end of two weeks. Our conversation turned to Airstream living, so of course DIL Denise found a dealership nearby. And we detoured. Because when you’re with Jeremy and Denise, you go with the flow and do things spur of the moment. And it’s always fun.

So we went ‘tiny house’ hunting at a Portland area Airstream dealership. Just to get a feel for what I could live in full time. Turns out, anywhere from the 23- to 26-footer would work just fine.

Yes, please!

One final thought …

Consider this Point-A-to-Point-B idea from a bigger-picture perspective:

If Point A is where you are now, and Point B is where you want to arrive, what can you do in between A and B to work toward the dream and have some secret joys along the way?

In my case, Point A is where I currently reside, and Point B is to get published. Could I invent some imaginary letters in between while traveling across the western states towing an Airstream, continuing to write and polish my craft?

I’m thinking yes.

What wildly imaginative thing have you considered doing? What are some of the steps toward making it happen?

Do you need to take the SAT or MCAT? Submit an application to college or med school? Complete a scholarship application?

Do you need to draft a business plan? Apply for a business license?

Do you need to establish a non-profit? Write for grant funding?

Do you need to craft a book proposal and actually submit it to someone?

Do you need to live in an Airstream for a couple weeks, and then visit an Airstream dealership?

Here’s to large and improbable dreams, and all the points in between!

12 Comments
  • Wendy Archer says:

    You are so right (as usual). I too look at the journey as a whole – point A, point B, and all the little points in between. To me the journey in between A and B is just as important as the destination – it is all part of the trip (and sometimes has been even better than the destination!). As always, thank you for reminding me of this Marlys. Happy travels to you, whatever journey you make. Hugs.

    • Well said, Wendy: “ … the journey in between A and B is just as important as the destination … (and sometimes has been even better than the destination!).” Thank you for weighing in with your insight!

  • Wendy Archer says:

    Forgot to say, Chloe is adorabubble. You are one lucky grandma, and she is one lucky pooch :*)

  • Grace Lawson says:

    Thank you as always, Dear Marlys, for your incredible news and now those most awesomely beautiful pictures you took !!! I know you want to do God’s will so may He show you what that is as you follow His leading !!!

  • Peter says:

    Thinking of travelling between point A to join B, is OK as a starting point but ‘don’t you just love to think’….about what might happen, what you may see and it’s all there for you to take in and cherish. I’ve often been heard to say amongst a cycle group, ‘Let’s stop and smell the roses’, it’s only then that you can have this expression mean what you want it to mean. I’m thinking now of the 3 rainbows, one on top of the other as we drove out onto the moors and wondering whose garden it stopped in!!!!!… it was there for us to cherish. May be I wasn’t supposed to know that the old steam train ‘Sir Nigel Gresley’ was going to be running on the Northern Line, but there she was in such splendour as she chugged on her way, all ‘blessings indeed’. Thanks again Marlys, for sharing. God Bless, Bx P & family.

  • Bre says:

    Are you visiting an airstream dealership?!?! I could definitely see you adventuring and writing. I’ll come visit you along your way sometime!!

    • Yes, Bre! My son and daughter-in-law took me to a dealership in the Portland area and we stepped inside several different models. If I do this thing, I would love to have you visit!

  • Mary Kittelson says:

    Hi Marlys, I continue to read and love your writing, your life. Carl and I continue to full-time RV, our home is where our wheels are, at present: Bullhead City, AZ overlooking the Colorado River. So, you are getting a taste of the nomad life! There are so many reasons why we love it, are into our 6th year, believe it or not.


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About Me

Hello, my name is Marlys Johnson. I’m a cancer widow, author, speaker and blogger. I love getting outdoors; would rather lace up hiking boots than go shopping. I have a passion for repurposing old junk into cool new stuff. And an even greater passion for showing people how to navigate life’s challenges. Tenaciously. And with heart wide open.

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